• September 23, 2016

    37th Annual RLPSA Award Recipients Announced

    ATLANTA, August 16, 2016 – Restaurant Loss Prevention & Security Association (RLPSA) announces its 37th Annual Award Recipients, selected for their strong leadership and innovative approaches to business challenges, while going “above and beyond” daily responsibilities to make a difference in restaurant loss prevention and security.

    The 2016 RLPSA Salute to Excellence Award is awarded to Jeff Levitt in recognition of his excellence in restaurant security through contributions to security programs that protect restaurant employees, customers, data and assets. Levitt has been providing a safe environment for more than 8.3 million customers a week at Panera, LLC. Levitt has proven to be a thought leader that employs innovative strategies to address restaurant security challenges.

    The 2016 RLPSA Distinguished Service Award is awarded to Ryan Berkey in recognition of his commitment to serving others in the Loss Prevention industry; making a difference and demonstrating creativity and compassion by developing programs that leave a lasting impact on those he has served for the last 25 years. Berkey designed the in-house exception base reporting to identify losses in 4 key loss prevention metrics which impact his company’s bottom line. For Dominos, this program improved bottom line results totaling over $3.6 million in 2015.

    RLPSA also awarded Lifetime Achievement Awards to founding fathers Emil Monda and Tom Briggs, for their foundational and pioneering work to start the RLPSA organization over 40 years ago.

    About RLPSA
    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries. We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources and to learn about RLPSA membership, visit: http://www.rlpsa.com/

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  • September 23, 2016

    RLPSA Hosts Webinar with Marsh Risk Consulting

    Who: Marsh Risk Consulting hosts a one-hour webinar for RLPSA members, “Restaurant Industry Loss Trends: How Do You Compare? How Can You Improve?”

    What: The following topics will be covered:

    • Emerging trends found in restaurant industry workers’ compensation and general liability loss data.
    • How to identify and manage the potential risks and liabilities facing your organization.
    • The practical implications of the data and best practices to be implemented.

    Where: Online via RLPSA email invitation

    When: Tuesday, October 4, 2016, 2 – 3 PM EST

    Why: Is your restaurant experiencing the same workers’ compensation and general liability loss trends as your industry peers? Can you identify, measure, and manage the wide range of exposures and losses you face? Are you implementing the right cost-containment measures? Marsh’s panel of analytics, workforce, and claims experts will cover the loss trends identified in our recently released “Restaurant Industry Practice 2015 Loss Benchmark” report and explain what they could mean for your business.

    Who Should Attend: This webcast will be of interest to risk and financial professionals as well as those responsible for analytics, business intelligence, and reporting across the organization (e.g., risk managers, CFOs, general counsel, claims managers).

    Contact: Email your name, title, company and email address to RLPSA Executive Director, Amber Bradley, at amber.bradley@rlpsa.com to reserve your seat.

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  • September 11, 2016

    Krebs On Security: How to Spot Ingenico Self-Checkout Skimmers

    A KrebsOnSecurity story last month spread quickly to numerous social networks. The article was about credit card skimmers found in self-checkout lanes at some Walmart locations. It’s important to get ahead of breach trends by examining other issues happening elsewhere.

    See how self-checkout lanes were compromised and consider…could restaurants be next? http://bit.ly/28TfxwD

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  • August 26, 2016

    Jim Karger, Labor Law Expert, Speaks

    This week Jim Karger highlights conducting personal business at work, joint employer status, earning employee loyalty, the number one human abuse rights issue, and more…

    Connect with Jim Karger via LinkedIn.

    App makes it easier for businesses to fight minimum wage hikes
    Looking to “make it easier for small businesses to add their voices to the minimum wage debate,” the Employment Policies Institute recently launched an iPhone app called “Wage Engage.” It seeks to alert business owners when minimum wage legislation is introduced in their area — and then lobby against a wage hike measure “at the push of a button” by sending a generic message to lawmakers.
    http://money.cnn.com/2016/08/14/technology/minimum-wage-engage-app/index.htm

    Federal ALJ Says Ban on Conducting Personal Business in Handbook Violated NLRA Rights
    What’s next? The illegality of performing work during working hours. The National Labor Relations Board continues its assault against standard employment policies considered to interfere with employee rights. This time, a federal administrative law judge accepted the Board counsel’s argument that a casino’s policy banning employees from conducting personal business during scheduled working hours violates employees’ right to engage in concerted activity under Section 7 of the NLRA.
    Article here: http://www.jdsupra.com/legalnews/federal-alj-says-ban-on-conducting-32278/

    What Does Subway’s “Voluntary Agreement” with the US Department of Labor Mean for Joint Employer Status?

    This past week, Doctor’s Associates Inc.,  which is the owner and franchisor for the Subway sandwich restaurant chain entered into a Voluntary Agreement (the “Agreement”) with the US Department of Labor’s (DOL) Wage and Hour Division “as part of [Subway’s] broader efforts to make its franchised restaurants and overall business operations socially responsible,” and as part of Subway’s “effort to promote and achieve compliance with labor standards to protect and enhance the welfare” of Subway’s own workforce and that of its franchisees.

    While the Agreement appears intended to help reduce the number of wage and hour law claims arising at both Subway’s company owned stores and those operated by its franchisee across the country, the Agreement appears to add further support to efforts by unions, plaintiffs’ lawyers and other federal and state agencies such as the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB or Board), DOL’s own Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the EEOC to treat franchisors as joint employers with their franchisees.

    Article here: http://www.managementmemo.com/2016/08/12/what-does-subways-voluntary-agreement-with-the-us-department-of-labor-mean-for-joint-employer-status/#%2EV63ioH7jvHs%2Elinkedin

    The Unions’ Phony Fight for $15

    Since 2012, a group calling itself “Fight for $15” has staged street theater protests in cities around the country. These protests are billed as “strikes,” although only a handful of individuals seem to have actually walked off their jobs. Instead, one typically sees small groups of protesters outside a local restaurant who, after a brief demonstration, are bused off to another city to repeat the process. To keep up media interest in these overhyped demonstrations, Fight for $15 has decided to host a “convention” in Richmond this week, hoping to piggyback on press attention from the presidential conventions in July.

    Fight for $15’s alleged purpose is to push for a higher minimum wage. Debate over the subject is certainly fair, but there is more than meets the eye to this group. While cleverly packaged as a genuine grassroots movement, the campaign is — in reality — a front organized and funded by the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the country’s largest labor union. In fact, according to U.S. Department of Labor reports, the SEIU has spent roughly $55 million on these activities.

    Article here:  Spencer – The unions’ phony fight for $15 – THEIR OPINION – Richmond, Va., News, Entertainment, Events, Food, Dining, Sports, Business and Commentary from Workforce Freedom’s Tweet

    Company’s Missions: Not Resonating With Employees
    Most leaders recognize that a clear mission and purpose are crucial to their company.

    Many have devoted considerable time and effort to developing such a statement and posting its words prominently for employees and customers to see. And for good reason: A mission or purpose statement declares why the company exists, what it stands for and — just as importantly — what it doesn’t stand for.

    A compelling purpose can drive companies toward positive business outcomes, give employees something to aspire to, and inspire customers to a deeper personal and emotional attachment to companies’ products, brands or services.

    The problem is that just four in 10 employees worldwide strongly agree that the mission or purpose of their company makes them feel their job is important. And less than half of workers in any industry feel strongly connected to their company’s mission. These sentiments might contribute to the fact that only 13% of employees worldwide, and just 33% of employees in the U.S., are engaged in their jobs.

    It’s clear that a majority of leaders and managers are failing to connect employees with their company’s mission or to sustain a purpose-driven culture.

    Article here: http://www.gallup.com/businessjournal/194642/company-missions-not-resonating-employees.aspx?utm_source=alert&utm_medium=email&utm_content=morelink&utm_campaign=syndication

    Want to Double Your Employee Loyalty? Science Says Provide These 3 Things

    • To feel safe. “I can take risks and not be demoralized or penalized.”
    • To feel like we belong. “These are my people. This is my tribe.”
    • To feel like we matter. “Is the work that I am doing meaningful to my organization? Am I making a dent in the universe?”

    That’s it. These are the three things we need to declare complete devotion to another person, cause, or organization.
    So why do we so often fail to inspire these feelings in those we need?

    Article here:  http://www.inc.com/marissa-levin/want-to-increase-employee-loyalty-by-67-100-science-says-to-provide-these-3-thi.html

    Jimmy Carter – Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse | TED Talk

    With his signature resolve, former US President Jimmy Carter dives into three unexpected reasons why the mistreatment of women and girls continues in so many manifestations in so many parts of the world, both developed and developing. The final reason he gives? “In general, men don’t give a damn.”

    Article here: Jimmy Carter: Why I believe the mistreatment of women is the number one human rights abuse  | TED Talk | TED.com

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  • August 7, 2016

    The ISIS Terror Threat in America

    Homeland Security Committee compiled an ISIS Terror Threat Snapshot in America for the month of July 2016. At the 2016 RLPSA Annual Conference, from Charles “Buck” Hamilton, Protective Security Advisor (PSA) with the Department of Homeland Security, described restaurants as having the characteristics of soft targets. Click here to download the ISIS Terror Threat in America Snapshot.

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  • July 18, 2016

    7 Social Media Tips for Restaurants/Bars

    Ready to stop fearing social media and use it as your brand ally?

    Creator of customer experiences, Randall Chesnutt, has compiled 7 Social Media Tips for Restaurants/Bars. See more at: http://bit.ly/1PBsKXz

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  • July 6, 2016

    5 Reasons to Pay Attention to Beacon Technology

    “Beacons” – A New Technology That Is Quickly Becoming Popular in the Restaurant Industry
    The restaurant industry is poised to make substantive use of beacon technology to not only build relationships with potential clients, but, and perhaps more importantly, to better serve existing customers. Beacons are part of what is called “Proximity Marketing.”

    So What are “Beacons”?
    Beacons (also called Stickers) are highly cost effective devices that can transmit information directly to a customer’s mobile device. Beacons use smartphone Bluetooth connections to transmit information to a mobile app. Once consumers download the app and choose to receive your information, their devices will be listening to your beacon which will automatically begin pinging their smartphone. Your marketing messages will be delivered each time a connected smartphone passes by your beacon. The incoming ping will sound whether the app is open or not.

    How Do Beacons Work?
    Beacons are tiny computers with powerful processors and large memory capabilities. They are powered by a coin battery and have built-in antennas and motion sensors. Beacons broadcast tiny radio signals which customers’ smartphones can receive. A downloaded app allows customer devices to receive and interpret micro-locations and contextual messages. Connecting with customers through beacons allows you to collect data and build a new generation of consumers that are connected to your brand, via their devices, in the real world.

    These small wireless beacons can be attached to any location or object and are small enough to be placed anywhere in a restaurant or nearby location. When smart devices come within range of the beacon, they will receive your messages. Some beacons can allow consumers to respond to the message, other beacons can enable security protection or services such as automated check-in or paperless payments.

    What Can “Beacons” Do For Your Business?
    Today’s consumers value their mobile devices as sources of information. Studies have shown that consumers also appreciate personalized mobile engagement based on their interests, locations, and buying preferences. Integrating beacons with your other mobile strategies will facilitate timely responses to the contextual content needs of your consumers. Mobile marketing with beacons can result in more customers, higher consumer satisfaction, and greater loyalty.

    The uses of beacons are seemingly endless. Here are just five ways you can use this new proximity-detection technology to tailor your customers’ experiences with your brand directly to their wants, needs and desires:

    1. Beacons can allow diners to order their drinks and meal choices on their way to your restaurant or from their table once they get to the restaurant, tapping into today’s customer’s desire for self-service options. Connecting through a beacon can let QSR customers order ahead to help reduce waiting time. A long-range beacon can also ensure that a specialty order is ready for pick-up by alerting the kitchen staff when the customer is within a certain distance from the location.

    2. Placing beacons close to a restaurant’s location can incentivize potential customers to come to your restaurant by offering special offers or other promotions such daily lunch or dinner deals. This technology eliminates the need for giant signs outside your restaurant or passing out flyers in the parking lot.

    3. Beacons placed in the parking lot or down the street can inform customers as to current wait times. Customers don’t like long wait times, but if they alerted to the wait time ahead of them they can plan accordingly, perhaps to take a leisurely walk around the area or enjoy a drink at the bar. Customers will appreciate your transparency and effort to give them a good dining experience.

    4. Beacons can remind diners as they exit to provide their comments and opinions in real-time. This eliminates the additional step of diners having to go to a computer to access your online customer satisfaction survey. Bringing the survey directly to the customer in this ultra-convenient way can increase the chances of their participation.

    5. Beacons can deliver personalized menu offerings to regular customers based on previous orders, send rewards to frequent visitors, and deliver discount offers to entice first-time customers to come back again.

    Use Beacons to Connect with Your Customer
    The restaurant industry has a lot to gain from proximity marketing which allows establishments to build meaningful and personalized relationships with their customers. Beacons collect massive amounts of behavioral data that can shed light on restaurant traffic, such as the number of hits for a particular offer, the length of time that customers dwell on the marketing messages, the busiest date and time ranges for message reception, etc. All this analytic information can result in better allocation of staff and other resources and improvement of customer services, such as menu adjustment and types of promotions offered. Ultimately beacons can help provide your customers with the best experience possible, resulting in increased consumer loyalty.

    About RLPSA

    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: www.rlpsaannualconference.com.

    Read More
  • June 19, 2016

    Loss Prevention…It’s always on the menu!

    Monetary/profit losses in the restaurant industry can amount to billions of dollars every year, but loss prevention policies can incorporate preventative measures to mitigate the damage wrought by these ever-increasing numbers. Of course, there’s always more to understand and more to do when it comes to LP in the restaurant industry.

    Where do most losses occur?

    The root causes of most losses to a business fall into three general categories:

    1. Internal theft
    2. External theft
    3. Employee/Vendor Error

    All three of these areas obviously require their own set of rules and regulations concerning loss prevention. But as broad as these categories appear, they still have much in common.

    Dealing with loss no matter the cause

    Of course, it’s important to categorize, analyze, and evaluate the specific kinds of loss in an industry, but addressing the occurring loss, no matter where it originates, can be organized and deliberate. In its report, The 6 Principles of Loss Prevention, LP Innovations (LPI) urges companies to take actions dealing with loss, on six fronts.

    1. Prevention
    Prevention is necessary for effective long-term solutions. Powerful preventative measures can put safeguards in place, make sure resources are used wisely, and provide a framework for loss prevention actions and reactions. A prevention plan should include written, measurable policies and procedures, a workable communication plan, effective measurement instruments, dedicated resources to ensure success, and a solid commitment from management and loss prevention professionals.

    2. Awareness
    An effective Loss Prevention program requires buy-in from many sources; up and down the organizational hierarchy, across multiple departments/divisions, and in and outside the company. Communication channels might include newsletters, podcasts, webinars, training sessions, email blasts, and listserv information blurbs. Though the vehicles may vary, the message should always be clear, concise, complete, and consistent.

    3. Compliance
    LP policies and procedures only work if they are implemented and followed. Making sure everyone is on board and adhering to the LP plan will require some sort of compliance evaluation. This evaluation may take several forms from informal questioning of employees and compliance checklists to more formal compliance audits. Knowing where misunderstandings or inactions lie regarding the LP plan can help identify problem areas.

    4. Detection
    It’s sometimes hard to be extra-observant in familiar environments. Small changes overtime are less noticeable. When it comes to loss detection, however, it is important to not just observe changes, but rather detect what is happening in a given situation. A simple employee mistake, made over and over again because it wasn’t detected, can lead to much larger problems in the future. Detection should ultimately lead to correction.

    Some steps to follow:

    • Articulate a clear plan of what should be happening in all operations.
    • Identify what signs to look for when detecting errors.
    • Plan regular, consistent, objective, and systemic audits of compliance.
    • Analyze all data from informal observations, scheduled inspections, and auditing reports.

    5. Investigation
    When problem areas aren’t fixed early or preventative measures don’t thwart a loss, an investigation may be necessary. This, of course, means that a loss has occurred. But now the goal is to reduce future losses. Proper investigation will require highly trained professionals who understand the legal protocols involved in the collection of evidence, invasion of privacy issues, evaluation of facts, questioning of victims and alleged perpetrators, and formal, written accusation procedures.

    6. Resolution
    Resolution involves the actions taken to address the problem and the implementation of a plan to prevent its recurrence. Resolution can include revisions to company policies such as better screening procedures for employees, more secure money-handling procedures, computer monitoring, up-dated training sessions, relocating surveillance cameras, etc. The two key drivers of any resolutions efforts and decisions should be the policies of the company and the human factors involved. Resolution efforts, including all post-event analysis and implementation of new policies, should be documented.

    Positive outcomes from negative events can lead to future success

    The process of Prevention, Awareness, Compliance, Detection, Investigation, and Resolution sets up a specific plan of action for dealing with losses that fall under the broad categories of internal theft, external theft, and human error, in many types of businesses. The LP issues that have to be addressed on a daily basis may seem mundane at times, but bigger problems may point to the need for a rigorous examination of present policies. Considering changes to work effectively for tomorrow’s business, especially in the light of an ever-shifting consumer landscape and an increasingly high-tech world can be daunting. Start with step one… move ahead with determination and vigilance…the plan will take shape.

    About RLPSA

    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: http://www.rlpsaannualconference.com/

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  • June 5, 2016

    How to Minimize Security Vulnerabilities for QSRs

    Quick-serve restaurants are popular eating places for several reasons. Unfortunately, some of those are the very reasons why these establishments need enhanced security programs.

    Why Quick-Serve Restaurants are Vulnerable to Crime
    Quick-serve restaurants (QSR) are found everywhere, from popular meeting areas to tucked away nooks and crannies of every city. These various locations meet the demands of an ‘on-the-go’ society, but it also means QSRs may be situated in not-so-desirable parts of town. QSRs are often open late at night, many operate on a 24-hour-a-day schedule. Typically, QSRs are staffed by young people, who may not be aware of their surroundings or attentive to suspicious customers. QSRs can attract tired or stressed patrons in need of a quick meal, but these off-peak hours of operation can also invite unstable or irritated customers onto the QSR premises. Finally, these eateries present a convenient access to fast getaway thoroughfares or dark alleyways, have an abundance of cash on site, and often have inexperienced staff in their employ. These factors add up to the perfect target for ill-willed criminals.

    How to Mitigate Security Vulnerabilities
    Depending on location and hours of operation, each individual QSR site has varying security concerns. To mitigate these security vulnerabilities that are unique to each location, it’s important to walk each QSR site using a checklist similar to the following:

    • Lighting: Is the lighting sufficient at all hours of the day to deter loitering and increase safety of employees and customers entering/exiting the location?
    • Visibility: Are there any areas within the restaurant that are obscured from view of employees and the public?
    • Cash Safe: Is the safe securely locked at all times and is the office work area out of sight to the public? Does the safe have a time-delay?
    • Employee Preparedness: Have all employees been deliberately trained on safety procedures and robbery prevention?
    • Security: Are video surveillance systems and alarm systems in good working order?
    • Structure: Are the drive-thru windows fortified? Is there a peephole on the back door so employees can see who is on the other side before opening? Is every lock in working order?
    • Monies: Is the frequency of cash audits sufficient to monitor adherence to store policy?
    • High-Quality Staff: Are rigorous background checks and mandatory drug tests conducted on all potential employees?

    Are the Security Measures ‘Reasonable and Adequate’?
    Working through this checklist will also help owners/operators of QSRs provide ‘reasonable and adequate’ security measures required by law. Establishments must plan for a level of security that will keep their customers and employees safe. The ‘level of security’ will vary on the restaurant’s location, its clientele, and perhaps even special conditions at particular places, such as proximity to stores selling alcohol, or bars that turn out customers late at night. Failing to provide ‘reasonable and adequate’ security can be considered negligent management.

    Tailored Security Plans Are the Most Effective
    Developing a security plan that exactly fits a particular QSR is the ultimate goal. The first step would be to conduct a basic risk assessment to determine the level of risk and security threat, per the checklist above. Next, security personnel should create a workable plan within a budget that starts with basic security measures and then adds resources and equipment to deal with specific problems or challenges. It should always be kept in mind, however, that budget concerns should never win out over the safety of customers and staff. Finally, the security plan must be constantly and regularly monitored and evaluated for effectiveness and to ensure the business is keeping up with escalating crime or other security issues. Assessment is crucial to properly maintaining the threshold level of providing ‘reasonable and adequate’ security measures.

    About RLPSA
    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: http://www.rlpsaannualconference.com/

    Read More
  • May 22, 2016

    LP & Security Alert: Employee Training is Essential for Your Success

    The opening bells of the new year welcomed a vibrant restaurant industry with open arms. Restaurant sales soared in 2015, marking the fifth year in a row for increased growth. Statistics reported that nearly a quarter of all U.S. consumers ate out at least once a month and more than 10 percent of these diners frequented a restaurant every week.

    The best news is that these positive numbers are expected to continue in 2016. Though some sources say the economy is in a lull, the above figures tell a different story, at least for the restaurant industry.

    How Can Employers Get the Best Work from Their Workforce?

    So what’s on the agenda for 2016? What issues needs to be addressed? Rising labor costs, of course.

    Stories of increased minimum wage limits have made news headlines across the country. Some employers are leading the charge; others are jumping angrily up and down, or perhaps moaning and wailing about lower profits. And some are simply complacent and accepting. There’s no right or wrong way to accept this turn of events.

    The relevant question is how can employers make sure they are getting the best work from the employees they hire at whatever hourly wage?

    Employers need knowledgeable and competent workers who can effectively cater to the needs of ever-more discerning and demanding customers. To achieve these ends, employee education and training is vital.

    Login to read more…

    ABOVE IS WHAT THE PUBLIC CAN SEE.  BELOW IS WHAT IS RESERVED FOR PRIVATE MEMBERS.

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