• August 7, 2016

    The ISIS Terror Threat in America

    Homeland Security Committee compiled an ISIS Terror Threat Snapshot in America for the month of July 2016. At the 2016 RLPSA Annual Conference, from Charles “Buck” Hamilton, Protective Security Advisor (PSA) with the Department of Homeland Security, described restaurants as having the characteristics of soft targets. Click here to download the ISIS Terror Threat in America Snapshot.

    Read More
  • July 18, 2016

    7 Social Media Tips for Restaurants/Bars

    Ready to stop fearing social media and use it as your brand ally?

    Creator of customer experiences, Randall Chesnutt, has compiled 7 Social Media Tips for Restaurants/Bars. See more at: http://bit.ly/1PBsKXz

    Read More
  • July 6, 2016

    5 Reasons to Pay Attention to Beacon Technology

    “Beacons” – A New Technology That Is Quickly Becoming Popular in the Restaurant Industry
    The restaurant industry is poised to make substantive use of beacon technology to not only build relationships with potential clients, but, and perhaps more importantly, to better serve existing customers. Beacons are part of what is called “Proximity Marketing.”

    So What are “Beacons”?
    Beacons (also called Stickers) are highly cost effective devices that can transmit information directly to a customer’s mobile device. Beacons use smartphone Bluetooth connections to transmit information to a mobile app. Once consumers download the app and choose to receive your information, their devices will be listening to your beacon which will automatically begin pinging their smartphone. Your marketing messages will be delivered each time a connected smartphone passes by your beacon. The incoming ping will sound whether the app is open or not.

    How Do Beacons Work?
    Beacons are tiny computers with powerful processors and large memory capabilities. They are powered by a coin battery and have built-in antennas and motion sensors. Beacons broadcast tiny radio signals which customers’ smartphones can receive. A downloaded app allows customer devices to receive and interpret micro-locations and contextual messages. Connecting with customers through beacons allows you to collect data and build a new generation of consumers that are connected to your brand, via their devices, in the real world.

    These small wireless beacons can be attached to any location or object and are small enough to be placed anywhere in a restaurant or nearby location. When smart devices come within range of the beacon, they will receive your messages. Some beacons can allow consumers to respond to the message, other beacons can enable security protection or services such as automated check-in or paperless payments.

    What Can “Beacons” Do For Your Business?
    Today’s consumers value their mobile devices as sources of information. Studies have shown that consumers also appreciate personalized mobile engagement based on their interests, locations, and buying preferences. Integrating beacons with your other mobile strategies will facilitate timely responses to the contextual content needs of your consumers. Mobile marketing with beacons can result in more customers, higher consumer satisfaction, and greater loyalty.

    The uses of beacons are seemingly endless. Here are just five ways you can use this new proximity-detection technology to tailor your customers’ experiences with your brand directly to their wants, needs and desires:

    1. Beacons can allow diners to order their drinks and meal choices on their way to your restaurant or from their table once they get to the restaurant, tapping into today’s customer’s desire for self-service options. Connecting through a beacon can let QSR customers order ahead to help reduce waiting time. A long-range beacon can also ensure that a specialty order is ready for pick-up by alerting the kitchen staff when the customer is within a certain distance from the location.

    2. Placing beacons close to a restaurant’s location can incentivize potential customers to come to your restaurant by offering special offers or other promotions such daily lunch or dinner deals. This technology eliminates the need for giant signs outside your restaurant or passing out flyers in the parking lot.

    3. Beacons placed in the parking lot or down the street can inform customers as to current wait times. Customers don’t like long wait times, but if they alerted to the wait time ahead of them they can plan accordingly, perhaps to take a leisurely walk around the area or enjoy a drink at the bar. Customers will appreciate your transparency and effort to give them a good dining experience.

    4. Beacons can remind diners as they exit to provide their comments and opinions in real-time. This eliminates the additional step of diners having to go to a computer to access your online customer satisfaction survey. Bringing the survey directly to the customer in this ultra-convenient way can increase the chances of their participation.

    5. Beacons can deliver personalized menu offerings to regular customers based on previous orders, send rewards to frequent visitors, and deliver discount offers to entice first-time customers to come back again.

    Use Beacons to Connect with Your Customer
    The restaurant industry has a lot to gain from proximity marketing which allows establishments to build meaningful and personalized relationships with their customers. Beacons collect massive amounts of behavioral data that can shed light on restaurant traffic, such as the number of hits for a particular offer, the length of time that customers dwell on the marketing messages, the busiest date and time ranges for message reception, etc. All this analytic information can result in better allocation of staff and other resources and improvement of customer services, such as menu adjustment and types of promotions offered. Ultimately beacons can help provide your customers with the best experience possible, resulting in increased consumer loyalty.

    About RLPSA

    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: www.rlpsaannualconference.com.

    Read More
  • June 19, 2016

    Loss Prevention…It’s always on the menu!

    Monetary/profit losses in the restaurant industry can amount to billions of dollars every year, but loss prevention policies can incorporate preventative measures to mitigate the damage wrought by these ever-increasing numbers. Of course, there’s always more to understand and more to do when it comes to LP in the restaurant industry.

    Where do most losses occur?

    The root causes of most losses to a business fall into three general categories:

    1. Internal theft
    2. External theft
    3. Employee/Vendor Error

    All three of these areas obviously require their own set of rules and regulations concerning loss prevention. But as broad as these categories appear, they still have much in common.

    Dealing with loss no matter the cause

    Of course, it’s important to categorize, analyze, and evaluate the specific kinds of loss in an industry, but addressing the occurring loss, no matter where it originates, can be organized and deliberate. In its report, The 6 Principles of Loss Prevention, LP Innovations (LPI) urges companies to take actions dealing with loss, on six fronts.

    1. Prevention
    Prevention is necessary for effective long-term solutions. Powerful preventative measures can put safeguards in place, make sure resources are used wisely, and provide a framework for loss prevention actions and reactions. A prevention plan should include written, measurable policies and procedures, a workable communication plan, effective measurement instruments, dedicated resources to ensure success, and a solid commitment from management and loss prevention professionals.

    2. Awareness
    An effective Loss Prevention program requires buy-in from many sources; up and down the organizational hierarchy, across multiple departments/divisions, and in and outside the company. Communication channels might include newsletters, podcasts, webinars, training sessions, email blasts, and listserv information blurbs. Though the vehicles may vary, the message should always be clear, concise, complete, and consistent.

    3. Compliance
    LP policies and procedures only work if they are implemented and followed. Making sure everyone is on board and adhering to the LP plan will require some sort of compliance evaluation. This evaluation may take several forms from informal questioning of employees and compliance checklists to more formal compliance audits. Knowing where misunderstandings or inactions lie regarding the LP plan can help identify problem areas.

    4. Detection
    It’s sometimes hard to be extra-observant in familiar environments. Small changes overtime are less noticeable. When it comes to loss detection, however, it is important to not just observe changes, but rather detect what is happening in a given situation. A simple employee mistake, made over and over again because it wasn’t detected, can lead to much larger problems in the future. Detection should ultimately lead to correction.

    Some steps to follow:

    • Articulate a clear plan of what should be happening in all operations.
    • Identify what signs to look for when detecting errors.
    • Plan regular, consistent, objective, and systemic audits of compliance.
    • Analyze all data from informal observations, scheduled inspections, and auditing reports.

    5. Investigation
    When problem areas aren’t fixed early or preventative measures don’t thwart a loss, an investigation may be necessary. This, of course, means that a loss has occurred. But now the goal is to reduce future losses. Proper investigation will require highly trained professionals who understand the legal protocols involved in the collection of evidence, invasion of privacy issues, evaluation of facts, questioning of victims and alleged perpetrators, and formal, written accusation procedures.

    6. Resolution
    Resolution involves the actions taken to address the problem and the implementation of a plan to prevent its recurrence. Resolution can include revisions to company policies such as better screening procedures for employees, more secure money-handling procedures, computer monitoring, up-dated training sessions, relocating surveillance cameras, etc. The two key drivers of any resolutions efforts and decisions should be the policies of the company and the human factors involved. Resolution efforts, including all post-event analysis and implementation of new policies, should be documented.

    Positive outcomes from negative events can lead to future success

    The process of Prevention, Awareness, Compliance, Detection, Investigation, and Resolution sets up a specific plan of action for dealing with losses that fall under the broad categories of internal theft, external theft, and human error, in many types of businesses. The LP issues that have to be addressed on a daily basis may seem mundane at times, but bigger problems may point to the need for a rigorous examination of present policies. Considering changes to work effectively for tomorrow’s business, especially in the light of an ever-shifting consumer landscape and an increasingly high-tech world can be daunting. Start with step one… move ahead with determination and vigilance…the plan will take shape.

    About RLPSA

    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: http://www.rlpsaannualconference.com/

    Read More
  • June 5, 2016

    How to Minimize Security Vulnerabilities for QSRs

    Quick-serve restaurants are popular eating places for several reasons. Unfortunately, some of those are the very reasons why these establishments need enhanced security programs.

    Why Quick-Serve Restaurants are Vulnerable to Crime
    Quick-serve restaurants (QSR) are found everywhere, from popular meeting areas to tucked away nooks and crannies of every city. These various locations meet the demands of an ‘on-the-go’ society, but it also means QSRs may be situated in not-so-desirable parts of town. QSRs are often open late at night, many operate on a 24-hour-a-day schedule. Typically, QSRs are staffed by young people, who may not be aware of their surroundings or attentive to suspicious customers. QSRs can attract tired or stressed patrons in need of a quick meal, but these off-peak hours of operation can also invite unstable or irritated customers onto the QSR premises. Finally, these eateries present a convenient access to fast getaway thoroughfares or dark alleyways, have an abundance of cash on site, and often have inexperienced staff in their employ. These factors add up to the perfect target for ill-willed criminals.

    How to Mitigate Security Vulnerabilities
    Depending on location and hours of operation, each individual QSR site has varying security concerns. To mitigate these security vulnerabilities that are unique to each location, it’s important to walk each QSR site using a checklist similar to the following:

    • Lighting: Is the lighting sufficient at all hours of the day to deter loitering and increase safety of employees and customers entering/exiting the location?
    • Visibility: Are there any areas within the restaurant that are obscured from view of employees and the public?
    • Cash Safe: Is the safe securely locked at all times and is the office work area out of sight to the public? Does the safe have a time-delay?
    • Employee Preparedness: Have all employees been deliberately trained on safety procedures and robbery prevention?
    • Security: Are video surveillance systems and alarm systems in good working order?
    • Structure: Are the drive-thru windows fortified? Is there a peephole on the back door so employees can see who is on the other side before opening? Is every lock in working order?
    • Monies: Is the frequency of cash audits sufficient to monitor adherence to store policy?
    • High-Quality Staff: Are rigorous background checks and mandatory drug tests conducted on all potential employees?

    Are the Security Measures ‘Reasonable and Adequate’?
    Working through this checklist will also help owners/operators of QSRs provide ‘reasonable and adequate’ security measures required by law. Establishments must plan for a level of security that will keep their customers and employees safe. The ‘level of security’ will vary on the restaurant’s location, its clientele, and perhaps even special conditions at particular places, such as proximity to stores selling alcohol, or bars that turn out customers late at night. Failing to provide ‘reasonable and adequate’ security can be considered negligent management.

    Tailored Security Plans Are the Most Effective
    Developing a security plan that exactly fits a particular QSR is the ultimate goal. The first step would be to conduct a basic risk assessment to determine the level of risk and security threat, per the checklist above. Next, security personnel should create a workable plan within a budget that starts with basic security measures and then adds resources and equipment to deal with specific problems or challenges. It should always be kept in mind, however, that budget concerns should never win out over the safety of customers and staff. Finally, the security plan must be constantly and regularly monitored and evaluated for effectiveness and to ensure the business is keeping up with escalating crime or other security issues. Assessment is crucial to properly maintaining the threshold level of providing ‘reasonable and adequate’ security measures.

    About RLPSA
    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: http://www.rlpsaannualconference.com/

    Read More
  • May 22, 2016

    LP & Security Alert: Employee Training is Essential for Your Success

    The opening bells of the new year welcomed a vibrant restaurant industry with open arms. Restaurant sales soared in 2015, marking the fifth year in a row for increased growth. Statistics reported that nearly a quarter of all U.S. consumers ate out at least once a month and more than 10 percent of these diners frequented a restaurant every week.

    The best news is that these positive numbers are expected to continue in 2016. Though some sources say the economy is in a lull, the above figures tell a different story, at least for the restaurant industry.

    How Can Employers Get the Best Work from Their Workforce?

    So what’s on the agenda for 2016? What issues needs to be addressed? Rising labor costs, of course.

    Stories of increased minimum wage limits have made news headlines across the country. Some employers are leading the charge; others are jumping angrily up and down, or perhaps moaning and wailing about lower profits. And some are simply complacent and accepting. There’s no right or wrong way to accept this turn of events.

    The relevant question is how can employers make sure they are getting the best work from the employees they hire at whatever hourly wage?

    Employers need knowledgeable and competent workers who can effectively cater to the needs of ever-more discerning and demanding customers. To achieve these ends, employee education and training is vital.

    Login to read more…

    ABOVE IS WHAT THE PUBLIC CAN SEE.  BELOW IS WHAT IS RESERVED FOR PRIVATE MEMBERS.

    Read More
  • May 8, 2016

    How Digital Technology Impacts Loss Prevention and Security Plans

    What’s in the plan for 2016 to expand the business, increase profits, or get more market share…and how can that be protected?

    The 2015 QSR state-of-the-industry survey given to hundreds of restaurant operators reported that 36% of employers are anticipating offsetting increased minimum wage levels by leveraging digital innovations to increase efficiency of operations. Restaurant operators surveyed gave “Digital Innovations” a 3.02 ranking on a scale of 1 (not very important) to 5 (extremely important).

    Experts say the move to digital technology is inevitable

    Here’s some data shared by employers who responded to the QSR survey.

    What “customer-facing technologies” do you use?

    • Call ahead = 47% of respondents.
    • Online ordering = 42% of respondents.
    • Mobile ordering = 35% of respondents.
    • Mobile payments = 27% of respondents.
    • Text messaging = 21% of respondents.
    • Employee handheld devices = 17% of respondents.
    • Pay-at-the-table = 15% of respondents.

    What percent of sales comes via digital ordering (mobile/online)?

    • 1-10% of survey respondents said 45% of sales comes from digital ordering.
    • 11-25% of survey respondents said 17% of sales comes from digital ordering.
    • 26-50% of survey respondents said 5% of sales comes from digital ordering.

    More than 50% of survey respondents said 3% of sales comes from digital ordering.

    What’s Trending Now?

    The trend toward digital customer interface is growing rapidly. Employers in the survey reported that they are likely to employ online ordering, mobile ordering, mobile payments and mobile loyalty programs, text messaging services, and employee handheld devices in the next 3-5 years.

    Mobile payments were listed as “very likely” by 19% of respondents; mobile ordering was listed as “very likely” 18%. Mobile loyalty programs were cited as “very likely” by 20% of respondents, while 53% of respondents reported that they give loyalty dollar discounts.

    Of course, adopting any of these new digital-enhanced actions will require significant investment in software, equipment, and training. An overwhelming 70% of employers reported that they intend to invest more capital in their digital presence in the coming year.

    How Will Loss Prevention Handle the Changes?

    LP and security plans will have to address a number of issues concerning increased digital technology: payment data theft, breaches in software, operating systems with “patches” creating new vulnerabilities, lack of standardized mobile pay security walls, and more sophisticated fraud perpetrators. Effective security plans will pay attention to actions such as removing sensitive data from their files, using encryption to prevent hacking, and adding increased security levels.

    Steps for Enhanced Digital Security

    Developing an up-to-date, digitally-focused security plan must be top priority.

    1. Have flexible policies and procedures that can be amended quickly as the digital environment morphs and changes.
    2. Stay ahead of the curve. This includes constant monitoring and investigating of trends that can affect your establishment’s security plan.
    3. Schedule software analyses. Is the software you are using up-to-date? If you have been “plugging holes” to stay current, are the fixes holding? Have passwords been changed recently to protect vital information?
    4. Learn more about cybercrime to develop ways to prevent it, and to develop plans to react to it in the event you become a victim. Crime rings continue to threaten retail and restaurant operations. Counterfeit e-receipts, reflected in the increase in fraud cases, is one area that has led to stricter security measures.
    5. Include training (i.e., how to properly operate devices or how to protect customer information) for all personnel involved with digital transactions.
    6. Communicate your company’s mission of protecting payment account information to customers who are increasingly demanding that businesses increase security while handling their sensitive data.

    What do Your Customers Want?

    The industry is seeing a pronounced shift to self-service orders from customers’ smartphones, tablets and computers. Will Hernandez, in “Emerging Mobile Payments, Trends for Restaurants,” says, “Consumers, particularly millennials, now demand more ways to communicate with their favorite brands, and restaurants are no exception.” Domino’s Pizza CEO, Patrick Doyle, reports that 50% of the chain’s U.S. sales can be attributed to digital channels, including smartphones, tablets, and smartwatches. Starbucks’ new “Mobile Order & Pay” program has seen great success in test markets and will be rolled out to all states in 2016. Other technologies that restaurant operators should watch out for are mobile point-of-sale products, beacons, and bitcoins.

    Don’t Fall Behind the Pack

    Restaurants seek to give their customers faster, reliable, and more personal experiences through expanded digital technology. However, as this mobile digital industry evolves, loss prevention and security professionals must take prudent measures keep up with the changes while protecting their business and their customers.

    About RLPSA

    The Restaurant Loss Prevention and Security Association (formerly NFSSC) is an exclusive community of loss prevention professionals focused on helping its members minimize losses and reduce liabilities within the restaurant and food industries.

    We are industry leaders sharing our collective expertise, knowledge and solutions to the challenges we face every day. Our goal is to make our members more efficient and successful in their careers by serving as the “go-to” resource for restaurant and food industry loss prevention and security professionals.

    As a member-run organization, we share information about industry trends and connect a network of peers who understand the unique challenges of the job, and who collaborate to find the next best solution. We create a forum for discussion and problem-solving so that our members benefit from shared expertise. We provide professional development opportunities that are designed to meet the specific interests and concerns of restaurant and food industry professionals, and we advocate for regulations that will make our workplaces more safe and secure.

    For more resources, attend our annual conference. Visit: http://www.rlpsaannualconference.com

    Read More
  • April 24, 2016

    Loss Prevention Considerations: The Growing Business of Food Trucks

    Loss Prevention Considerations: The Growing Business of Food Trucks

    Looking to Expand into a New Market?

    The multi-billion-dollar U.S. restaurant industry is enjoying a growth period. Soaring restaurant sales marked 2015 as the fifth year in a row for increased growth. Statistics reported that nearly a quarter of all U.S. consumers ate out at least once a month and more than 10 percent of these diners frequented a restaurant every week. Of course, no one wants to rest on their laurels and leaders, innovators, and progressive thinkers are trying to identify the next greatest trend in the restaurant business.

    Serving Consumers on the Move

    Consumers are always on the go. They travel more often and use their mobile devices to get them to places near and far as quickly as possible. Today’s consumers are not tied to brick and mortar establishments anymore. They are comfortable with shopping online, having personal services (teeth cleaning, massages, haircuts, etc.) performed in their home, and dealing with internet companies headquartered halfway around the world.

    One of the latest trends for this “on-the-move” society is the emergence of mobile food units, food trucks, and food trailers that offer a variety of menu items from simple (and not so simple) hot dogs with all the trimmings to vegetarian gourmet pasta dishes in various temporary locations. Some might say this is a “Moveable Feast” trend.

    But food trucks are more than just a hot trend. They’re quickly becoming one of the fastest-growing and most flexible business opportunities around the country. The National League of Cities report shows that the food truck business reached $650 million in 2012 and that amount is predicted to rise to $2.7 billion by 2017.

    Loss Prevention: Thoughts on Protecting Food Trucks

    For those thinking about investing in food trucks or kiosks, there are, of course lots of red tape to wade through and numerous challenges to overcome along the way. These can involve government restrictions and regulations, menu mandates, staffing needs, equipment maintenance, and security needs. Security must be assessed and planned effectively to include CCTV camera surveillance, lighting systems, auto-lock doors, and regular cash pick-ups.

    Just because many are willing to jump on the bandwagon of a new trend, doesn’t mean there aren’t risks involved, but the results seem to outweigh the risks. The 2015 QSR state-of-the-industry survey given to hundreds of restaurant operators reported that 15% of respondents said their brand had a food truck of some kind with another 16% saying they were thinking about expanding their business with a food truck(s). Some restaurant owners are considering opening/operating additional sites, separate from their restaurant location, in “new” places. The survey posed the question: “What types of nontraditional locations are you considering?” Topping the list was food courts/shopping malls with 34% of respondents saying they were considering this option. Next was sports stadiums cited by 27% of respondents as potential new sites and trailers, kiosks and food trucks were being considered by 20% of the respondents.

    Driving into the Future

    The restaurant industry is quickly adapting to the new changes and challenges ahead. In Charlotte, NC, Chow Down Uptown, a showcase of local food trucks, is celebrated on the last Thursday of the month. Hundreds of people grab street food while enjoying live music. In Charlotte’s historic Southend, Food Truck Friday features Wingzaa trucks and a Chrome Toaster school bus. The future of the restaurant industry is on overdrive.

    Read More
  • April 10, 2016

    3 Ways Employees Might Engage in Workers’ Compensation Fraud

    3 Ways Employees Might Engage in Workers’ Compensation Fraud

    Workers’ Compensation insurance provides necessary medical coverage for workers who are injured while doing their jobs. However, this safety net for employees is a significant expense for employers.

    Although Workers’ Compensation insurance rates vary state to state, the requisite premiums can be considerable for businesses, especially those that hire many employees to cover 24/7 operations, and the costs continue to rise.

    What does workers’ compensation fraud look like?

    As with other types of insurance, Workers’ Compensation insurance is often a victim of abuse and fraud. Some states consider insurance fraud a felony and violators are subject to prison time, fines, legal expenses, and court fees. Employers should be on the lookout for Workers’ Compensation fraud perpetrated by their employees.

    3 Ways Employees Engage with Workers’ Compensation Fraud

    1. Faking an injury.
      This false claim reports that a hurt back, strained muscle, or some other injury that can’t be “seen” occurred while working when no such injury was sustained. It can even include a self-inflicted injury that would qualify a worker for disability payments.

    2. Exaggerating an injury.
      Employees may be tempted to make his/her injury seem worse than it is, perhaps to either get more time off or the benefit of a free doctor visit for another, non-related injury. A California case involved a woman who allegedly used whiteout to alter her incident report (an injured knee while carrying boxes) to extend her claim of total disability.

    3. Giving false details.
      This claim could include reporting that the injury occurred on the job site or while performing work-related activities, when it did not. Other false details might make the owner seem negligible when he/she has not been. Perhaps standard safety measures were not followed or conditions of the floor or mats were reported differently than what was actually the case, etc.

    Employers try to keep Workers’ Compensation claims to a minimum while being attentive to the coverage of their employees. Safer workplaces though are the quickest way to lower claims, which ultimately lowers insurance rates.

    6 Action Steps to Make Workplace Safety a Reality

    1. Develop a plan that makes safety a “value”, rather than a “priority.” Priorities change, but a company value remains part of the everyday company culture. Put the plan and the company’s values regarding safety in writing. Communicate the plan and company values to all employees.
    2. Formulate a policy that holds employees accountable for following safety procedures, as per the official company plan. For example, some companies have a policy that states, “Working safely is a condition of employment.”
    3. Outline a disciplinary program that clearly explains the actions to be followed if an employee breaks the rules or files a false claim.
    4. Create incentives/rewards for employees who follow safety procedures, and create a hotline number where employees can anonymously report dishonest or unsafe employees.
    5. Make it clear that upper management fully endorses the safety plan and the subsequent penalties and rewards.
    6. Plan regular safety meetings or discussion forums to cover specific safety issues with employees.

    8 Steps to a Legitimate Claim

    Accidents happen, and employers and employees will always strive to prevent them. If an accident does happen though, here are some steps to take to make sure the claim is legitimate.

    1. Complete the accident report as soon as possible
    2. Include as much detail in the report as possible
    3. Take photos of the scene, employee, and injury.
    4. Interview and record the explanations/descriptions of anyone who witnessed the incident.
    5. Require a drug test of the employee claiming the injury.
    6. Check to see if the claimant is a repeat offender.
    7. Review the Workers’ Compensation claim for accuracy, deductible amounts, and associated costs pertaining to the injury.
    8. Consolidate the tracking of the case so that several entities, such as human resources, safety managers, and supervisors of the claimant, can view the details of the incident, the problem that needs to be fixed, or the duration of care/time off of work for the employee.

    5 Common Ways Employers Commit Insurance Fraud

    Employees are not the only ones to commit insurance fraud. Employer fraud is also very serious. Five ways employers might commit insurance fraud to evade Workers’ Compensation laws are:

    1. Underestimating payroll numbers to reduce premiums.
    2. Classifying employers as independent contractors when they are not.
    3. Skewing job descriptions to qualify for lower premiums.
    4. Hiring undocumented workers to avoid Workers’ Compensation premiums.
    5. Failing to carry Workers’ Compensation insurance for qualified employees.

    Workers’ compensation insurance fraud is serious. False reporting of an injury is also a serious issue. The Solution? Focus on workplace safety and remain aware of ways employees and employers alike can commit workers’ compensation insurance fraud.

    Read More
  • March 27, 2016

    UPDATE: Year One of OSHA’s Severe Injury Reporting Program: An Impact Evaluation

    UPDATE: Year One of OSHA’s Severe Injury Reporting Program: An Impact Evaluation

    Every year, tens of thousands of men and women across the United States are severely injured on the job, sometimes with permanent consequences to themselves and their families.

    Last year, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) lacked timely information about where and how most of those injuries were occurring, limiting how effectively the agency could response. Now, under a requirement that took effect January 1, 2015, employers must report to OSHA within 24 hours any work-related amputation, in-patient hospitalization, or loss of eye.

    See more information and program requirements at: Year One of OSHA’s Severe Injury Reporting Program: An Impact Evaluation.

    Attend RLPSA’s 37th Annual Conference to hear valuable safety content such as, “Falls Aren’t Funny” from the National Floor Safety Institute. For more information about our conference visit: www.rlpsaannualconference.com.

    Read More
Page 4 of 8
Skip to toolbar